November 23, 2020

Douglas A. Martin Quote

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We will go on from here, in this essayistic work, of which Acker’s fantastic, crudely philosophical letters are only one part of what will be revealed, to arrive at an injunction to “Define to love.” She underscores in her original. Acker begins to do this by exploiting, and upsetting, comfortable rhetorical models of logic. For example, after the opposition “love of knowledge” versus “love of sex” is established to mirror – Acker’s word – the mind : body opposition, Acker decides such a separation is resolved by the logical progression of her next sentence, that: The lovers of knowledge and the lovers of sex both love cats. Other oppositions, and their resolutions through third terms, follow. Acker does what she says she will do here: “Define to love by increasing complexity.”

– Douglas A. Martin, Acker



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November 17, 2020

Table of Contents for a work-in-progress

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Preface

1: The moment I no longer wanted to be famous
2: Amateur Compassion
3: Promiscuous Bewilderment
4: The world ends in our desires
5: A story about computers in the future
6: There can be no theory of the novel that is not itself a novel
7: The billionaires have quietly left the building
8: Helpless laughter happens more than once
9: The doctorette (with others) make a discovery
10: Fascism was something we often talked about
11: A hell called paradise mission
12: To the success of our hopeless mission
13: Compersion
14: Real Life
15: the world is ending / the world is unending

Afterward








(A novel about ecological collapse and telepathic kittens.)








(Right now I'm about ten pages into writing chapter six.)



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